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Push vs Pull Marketing

PULL Marketing vs. PUSH Marketing – The Shifting Battleground

Even though I make my living as a marketer, I get as bothered as any other consumer by the constant intrusiveness of unwanted promotions. The abundance of unsolicited marketing pitches from TV, radio, Internet ads and other media exasperates me daily. Yet, as hard as we try to get away from it (using tools like DVR, Sirius Radio, cable, and voicemail), persistent marketers continue to find new ways to track us down and share their messages, regardless of our needs or receptivity.

Here are a few examples of irritating push marketing techniques:

  1. Anyone showing up uninvited. Whether at the office or home, this is particularly irritating. The exceptions are neighborhood scouts or sports teams.
  2. YouTube requires you to watch short commercials prior to viewing their content.
  3. Newspapers that contain ads that are wrapped around the editorial content, so you have to go through multiple gyrations to get to the news stories.
  4. Online, floating banner ads are becoming more intrusive and harder to ignore. They follow your cursor until you can find the “close” button.
  5. Unsolicited telephone calls are still an annoyance except they are now from so-called “market researchers” and charities, which are exempt from the privacy requirements. Who came up with that loophole?

Here’s the problem. Push marketing is intrusive and often ineffective because, at any given time, a majority of your audience, whether they are listeners, viewers, or readers, have no interest whatsoever in what you are promoting. They may be interested in the future, but if you come on too strong when they are not receptive, you may turn them off forever.

In some cases, you may have a lead requirement that can only be met with push marketing techniques. If so, by all means use the necessary techniques to meet your lead objectives. But often, you have a choice, and a more effective alternative is to practice pull marketing strategies. Pull marketing centers around the idea that you actively draw clients or customers to seek out your product or services. You do this by discovering where your prospects congregate, making your information available to them in educational and entertaining ways and giving them incentives to come to you when they have a need for what you offer. Instead of having a monologue (as evidenced in push marketing) with your clients or customers, you create a dialogue with pull marketing – a dialogue between you and the prospect.

Transitioning from push to pull marketing strategies is a subtle shift in thinking, but it is also quite powerful. Instead of asking: How many people can I sell to today?, the question becomes: How can I help people solve their problems? In the first scenario, you are a seller, almost an adversary. In the second, you are a helper whose expertise (and wise placement of messages) sells itself. Instead of just relying on ads pushing your value proposition, you produce valuable content (through social media and at your website) that solves problems. In other words, you become a trusted resource and thought leader who circulates a carefully crafted message that attracts the people who need you.

Nevertheless, there will always be an ongoing battle between consumers and push marketers. The latter will continue to try new and clever ways to force the former to pay attention and respond to their promotions. But I submit that a much more effective plan is to uncover a way to attract a larger share of the people who are already interested in what you offer and then convince them to do business with you. It is always easier and more pleasant when you can fulfill an existing need instead of trying to create a need.

In the push model, the marketer is seemingly in charge of everything – the timing, content and frequency of promotions. However, in reality, your consumer is the one in charge, because only he or she can decide whether or not to read or listen to your promotion and whether to respond.

When you are deciding how much of time and financial resources to allocate between push and pull marketing strategies, keep in mind that the battleground has shifted and the prospect is the one who holds the high ground. Rather than fight this reality, just accept who has the real control and find the best ways to help people buy in the way they want to buy, instead of the way you want to sell to them.

 

Note: this article originally appeared at www.GreatB2BMarketing.com

 

Word of Mouth Marketing

3 Free Ways to Boost Your Word-of-Mouth Marketing

The availability and speed of at-home internet connection has caused more people to create a side hustle, which in turn has increased competition. This increase in competition is in turn driving down margins while simultaneously driving up the advertising clutter as more and more people clamor for their customer’s attention.

Smaller margins translate to tighter budgets, which explains why word-of-mouth marketing is the principle marketing strategy most of my clients utilize before they walk into my office. After all, word-of-mouth marketing is essentially free.

When I ask my clients to elaborate on how their word-of-mouth strategy plays out, most simply suggest that if we make a good product or deliver a good service, their clients will tell their friends how great we are, which will in turn lead to a greater number of sales.

Suffice it to say, this is a rather passive tactic where you lose the ability to control the message delivered to potential clients. There are much better ways to use word-of-mouth to promote your product or service that are also essentially free, but allow you better control of the word-of-mouth message.

Most people think word-of-mount must be from your client’s mouth to your potential client’s ears. However, your word-of-mouth strategy should also include video, audio, and text you had a hand in creating. Next time you think about your word-of-mouth promotion strategy, you should include internet enabled word-of-mouth tools such as YouTube, podcasts, or blogs.

When you consider promoting your business in this day and age, don’t think about ads or commercials, which are essentially “interruption marketing” and are based on conditions that really no longer exists in much of the market place.

People hate T.V. and radio commercials as well as newspaper ads and have tools to filter out the promotional content. In fact, this idea came to me as I was watching T.V. on my Hopper by Dish Network whose value proposition is that they allow you to watch a delayed T.V. show where the company (Dish Network) effectively removes (or hops over) all the T.V. commercials for you, hence the name “Hopper”.

So today when you think “promotion,” you should think about developing content that establishes you as the expert. You no longer should focus on directly selling your product or service, because in the new age of the internet, you want other sites to link to your content to thereby spread the word about you and your company. When consumers of internet content see you as the expert, they will seek you out to buy your product or service when they become viable.

For example, when you are in the market for a new car, you’ll likely consult the internet. If you’re like 99% of shoppers, you won’t be searching for online ads produced by auto manufacturers to make your car buying decision. Instead, you’ll likely search for reviews and opinions on various makes and models provided by “experts.” If you are one of these experts and provide that valuable content, perhaps gained because you are an online auto broker, the consumer will seek you out when they are ready to buy because they perceive you as the expert and feel they can trust you.

The first step in harnessing internet word-of-mouth is to imagine that you are your customer and consider what they really need to know, then address that need using one or all three common and cheap internet enabled word-of-mouth strategies.

1. First, let’s consider YouTube. Next to Google, YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine and is where most people go to learn about a particular topic. Best of all, it is free to post your video content message on YouTube.

Let’s say you produce a stain-glass cutting system. You might provide a few YouTube videos showing how to cut stain-glass or how to make various projects, and “oh by the way” your demonstration uses your cutting system. If the viewer likes your content and needs a cutting system, many will see how easy the tool was for you to use and seek you out to buy one just like the one you used in your demonstration. Note: You never asked for the sale, but you should provide a way for the consumer to buy from you.

Make sure you concentrate on content or the viewer will consider it an interruption marketing message and filter your message out. Furthermore, if you simply produce an infomercial to showcase your product, other retail sites won’t link to your video, thereby eliminating the true value of internet word-of-mouth. All you need to produce a YouTube video is a simple webcam.

2. Then there are podcasts, which are essentially audio programs (mini radio broadcasts) downloaded or streamed as an mp3 file over the internet rather than over the airwaves. You can post podcasts directly on your website or upload them to show sites like iTunes or Stitcher for your potential client to download and listen to on their computer or mp3 devices such as the ubiquitous iPod or most smart phones.

Perhaps you are a lawyer who specializes in estate law. You could conduct a mock interview where you answer questions about estate law in your podcast. In the end, you establish yourself as the expert deserving of the customer’s business who will seek you out to help draft their estate documents when the need arises.

All you need to produce a podcast is a recording device such as your webcam or digital recorder. If you want to record a phone interview as part of your podcast, the “Smart” Phone Recorder Control from RadioShack only costs $20. Also, you will need some free computer audio editing software such as Audacity or a similar tool to both record input from an offline recording device like a digital recorder and edit it down to produce your own podcast that you can then share with the world on platforms like iTunes and Stitcher.

3. Finally, you can create your own blog where you can not only establish yourself as the expert that you are, but you can also create content with the express purpose of encouraging your clients to carry on a dialog with you.

For example, if you are a cleaning company, you could share how you might get a red-wine stain out of carpet and encourage others to share their tricks or encourage them to share their worst cleaning problem, which you can then address. Creating a blog is relatively simple with free content management tools like WordPress.

Using any or all of the above internet enabled word-of-mouth tactics allows you to control the dissemination of the information posted to the internet. Additionally, you can develop content that other sites will want to link to, thereby allowing you to take on a much more active role in implementing your word-of-mouth strategy.

How do you control word-of-mouth marketing?

Note: this article first appeared at www.SteveBizBlog.com

Marketing

Quality Products Don’t Matter – Marketing Does

Most people believe that it is the product or service that makes a business successful. To those people, I say they are wrong. From my prospective, it is marketing that makes a company a success. Consider this example – did Starbucks invent coffee? No. Are they the only company that says they have the best coffee? Again, no. The reason why Starbucks is successful when many other coffee shops never expand beyond their neighborhood is MARKETING.

Building a quality product takes a distant back seat to building a quality marketing campaign. Of course, if you deliver an inferior product or service, it will catch up with you at some point when word gets out. However, if you make a superior product and no one has any idea it exists, you’re out of business.

Today, especially in the long tail economy, marketing an average product or service to the right person at the right time trumps a quality product or service marketed to the wrong market at the wrong time. Therefore, I contend that entrepreneurs need to focus on a strategy to attract the right customers at the right time over engineering a truly unique product of service. The field of dreams line “build it and they will come” only happens in the movies. Today, you need to build the path to the customer first and foremost.

Do you value a quality product or quality marketing strategy more?

Note: this post originally appeared at www.stevebizblog.com

 

Sales and Marketing Fix

12 Quick Sales and Marketing Fixes

I write a lot about curing the chronic conditions of sales and marketing, but today will address the acute condition — when you need leads and revenue quickly. Here are 12 tactics to get you started:

  1. Stop doing what doesn’t work. Forgive me if this sounds blindingly obvious, but the fact is, inertia is a powerful force. We sometimes get caught up in our routines – even when they don’t produce such great results.
  2. Rebrand or reposition. I am not talking about a total rebrand or reposition here (which addresses the chronic condition), but rather modifying the messaging to match the needs of a particular target segment.
  3. Remarket to past prospects. There may be gold in your opt-in contact list, but you need to get out your shovel and mine that gold.
  4. Borrow an idea from your competitor(s). You may have competitors with large budgets and lots of marketing people whose entire goal in life is to take business away from you. Why not pay them back by borrowing one or more of their best tactics and modifying to your unique needs?
  5. Make a new offer. If your old standard offers are not working, try something entirely different. Do a drawing. Conduct a survey. Buy prospects pizza if they attend your lunch event or a coffee gift card if they talk to you in the morning. Test new offers until you find one or more that work.
  6. Send out a press release (or two). Although they are more of an awareness tool than a lead gen tool, press releases are a fast and inexpensive way to get the word out. And no, “My product is the greatest thing since sliced bread,” is not a proper subject for your release.
  7. Do 20% more. There are two major ways to improve marketing and sales productivity – do what you do better or do more of it. Sometimes the quickest fix is to focus on quantity.
  8. Measure and refine. If you aren’t measuring actual vs. anticipated results, you are likely not going to get better performance. I will be covering this topic in my upcoming webinar, How to Eliminate the “Promise vs. Reality Gap” of Marketing Automation.
  9. Incentivize your sales force. Smart sales managers know about the power of selective incentives to drive short-term gains in revenue. As one of my favorite CSOs often reminds me, sales reps are coin-operated — they go where the money is!
  10. Get rejected. Sales is both a quality and quantity game. If you are not being rejected often enough, you are probably not talking to enough potential prospects. When your revenue numbers are anemic, make sure your reps increase their activity at every stage of the sales cycle (e.g. do 20% more as mentioned above).
  11. Ask your prospects questions and then act on what they tell you. Here are four of the best questions:
    • What are you doing that is working?
    • What are you doing that isn’t working?
    • What is the one improvement that would add most to your success?
    • What does your ideal situation look like?
  12. Hire professionals. This may be a bit self-serving since my company does outsourced B2B marketing, but the fact is, those of us who have practiced these tactics hundreds, even thousands, of times usually have a good track record when it comes to getting results.